DixPix Photographs

     

EASTERN AFRICA

 
     
  Fauna- BIRDS  
     

 

Eastern and southeastern Africa is one of the better known 'birding' areas, with a huge number of species.  There is a Princeton Field Guide to the Birds of Eastern Africa by Terry Stevenson and John Fanshawe, originating in 2002.  This is also available in electronic form.  For photos on line, check www.tanzaniabirds.net.

Other pages of East Africa are    Critters       Flora        Life-overview

The Bateleur Eagle (Tetrathophus ecaudatus) is the national bird of Zimbabwe. Its hunting range covers much of sub saharan Africa, albeit this one has wound up at the Zoo in San Diego. Click to see big picture (483x600 pixels; 88 KB)
Ruppell's Griffin Vulture searches the equitorial latitudes of Africa for carcases from a great height, in fact it holds the record for the highest flying bird.  No wonder Gyps rueppellii looks so disgruntled in captivity. Click to see big picture (505x600 pixels; 129 KB)
Gypohierax angolensis is better known as the Palm Nut Vulture.  It is actually an omnivore, preferring wetlands and mangroves of sub saharan Africa.  The yellow-faced juvenile is on the left (Denver Zoo) and the adult on the right (Jurong Bird Park). Click to see big picture (800x503 pixels; 154 KB)
This is a male Tockus deckeni or Von der Decken's Hornbill.  The species is native to the dryer regions from Ethiopia to Tanzania.  London Zoo. Click to see big picture (800x544 pixels; 131 KB)
A closer look at the face and giant bill of Tockus deckeni.  Hornbills are sort of an Afro-Asian equivalent of the Toucans of the tropical Americas. Click to see big picture (800x593 pixels; 122 KB)
A Red-billed Hornbill surveys its domain.  Tockus erythrorhynchus is native to the equitorial latitudes of Africa, here in Tanzania. Click to see big picture (761x600 pixels; 133 KB)
Bucorvis leadbeateri is the largest of the Hornbills, and mainly hunts on the ground in southern and eastern Africa.  Known as the Southern Ground Hornbill, it is reported to be largely a carnivore.  Jurong Bird Park, Singapore. Click to see big picture (406x600 pixels; 126 KB)
The Yellow-necked Spurfowl has adapted well to the spread of agriculture in eastern Africa, in fact Francolinus leucoscepus has become somewhat of a pest. Click to see big picture (399x600 pixels; 129 KB)
They are known as Vulturine Guineafowl, which may seem a strange combination.  Acryllium vulturinum is the largest guineafowl, and it feeds on both seeds and small animals.  Terrestrial and gregarious, they range from Ethiopia to northern Tanzania.  Denver Zoo. Click to see big picture (676x600 pixels; 204 KB)
The Marabou Stork (Leptoptilos crumenifer) is a large bird, native to sub saharan Africa.  They tend to be gregarious, vocal, and consume both carrion and small game.  Photos from Mikumi Park, Tanzania. Click to see big picture (800x526 pixels; 173 KB)
In the same park, we come across a Saddle-billed Stork, whose latin name is the tongue-twisting Ephippiorhynchus senegalensis. Once again, a citizen of sub saharan Africa. Click to see big picture (640x509 pixels; 169 KB)
With the same general range, this is Ciconia abdimii, known as the Abdim's Stork. This one looks a little unhappy with life in the London Zoo. Click to see big picture (563x600 pixels; 143 KB)
Platalea alba, the African Spoonbill may be found in wet areas of southern and central Africa. Click to see big picture (372x600 pixels; 51 KB)
The Sacred Ibis has a native range of Africa and the Middle East, but has now been introduced more widely, in fact this photo is from Hawaii.  Threskiornis aethiopicus in pedantic circles. Click to see big picture (640x600 pixels; 165 KB)
The Wood Ibis, on the other hand, is largely confined to sub saharan Africa, mainly found in swamps lagoons and river of lake margins. This example of Mycteria ibis is captive at the Jurong Bird Park in Singapore, however. Click to see big picture (752x600 pixels; 107 KB)
Grey Crowned Cranes (Baelaerica regulorum) are endangered in their native east Africa, in a large part because they are in demand for the pet trade.  This one ended up in the zoo in Phoenix. Click to see big picture (800x533 pixels; 222 KB)
Alopochen aegyptiaca is known as the Egyptian Goose, and it is indeed native to the Nile Valley, but also wet areas through most of sub saharan Africa.   London Zoo. Click to see big picture (522x600 pixels; 180 KB)
A male Sarkidiornis melanotos demonstrates why the species is known as Comb Ducks. Click to see big picture (792x600 pixels; 148 KB)
Comb Ducks are large, almost goose-like birds which are widespread in the tropical zones of the world. Click to see big picture (584x600 pixels; 131 KB)
White-face Whistling Ducks  (Dendrocygna viduata) are found both in sub saharan Africa and in South America.  This one is at the zoo in London. Click to see big picture (672x600 pixels; 118 KB)
African Grey Parrots (Psittacus erithacus) are at home feasting on fruit and nuts in the equatorial latitudes of Africa.  They are, however, in great demand in the pet trade, as they can mimic human speech, and this one finds itself in the Bleodel Conservatory in Vancouver. Click to see big picture (534x600 pixels; 91 KB)
An African Black and White Crow examines a farm from a roof near Mbinga, Tanzania.  Corvus albus is also known as the Pied Crow, and is partial to human habitation through much of sub saharan Africa. Click to see big picture (513x600 pixels; 57 KB)
Chestnut-bellied Sand Grouse is the English name for Pterocles exustes. This bird may be found in deserts and dry scrub from Africa to India. San Diego Zoo. Click to see big picture (648x600 pixels; 168 KB)
A Dark-capped Bulbul near Arusha, Tanzania. Pycnonotus barbatus is a common site, hunting fruit, nectar and insects through much of Africa. Click to see big picture (598x600 pixels; 181 KB)
Vanellus armatus is found near lakes or marshes in southern and eastern Africa. here in Mikumi Park, Tanzania.  It is known as the Blacksmith Lapwing in English. Click to see big picture (672x600 pixels; 152 KB)
Vanellus spinosus is from the same genus, and is known as a Spur-winged Lapwing, but more commonly as the Spur-winged Plover. It is found mainly in the equatorial parts of africa, but some migrate into the Middle East. Denver Zoo. Click to see big picture (720x564 pixels; 183 KB)
Coracias abyssinicus goes by the catchy name of Abyssinian Roller.  It calls equatorial Africa home, but this one is on display at the zoo in San Diego. Click to see big picture (366x600 pixels; 103 KB)
An East African Golden Weaver attends it delicate, spherical nest in Tanzania.  Ploceus subaureus is found in southern and eastern Africa. Click to see big picture (513x600 pixels; 79 KB)
The Superb Starling (Lamprotornis superbus) doesn't look much like the common starlings, but has the same loud and gregarious nature.  It is native from Ethiopia to Tanzania, here at the London Zoo. Click to see big picture (538x600 pixels; 95 KB)