DixPix Photographs

         

EASTERN AFRICA

 
     
  ASSORTED CRITTERS  
     

 

The larger animals of Eastern Africa have been photographed from all possible angles by more professional photographers than I, but some of the lesser reptiles, insects, etc. have not received so much attention that they clog the internet with photos.  Here are a few of these more retiring creatures.

Other pages from East Africa      Birds        Flora         Life- Overview

 

A Black Mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis), captive near Mikumi National Park, Tanzania. It is native to Eastern and Southern Africa, and is the largest of that continent's poisonous snakes. The term "black" refers to the inside of its mouth. A bad actor from the Elapidae Family. Click to see big picture (800x600 pixels; 112 KB)
And from the same area, this is Dendroaspis angusticeps, the Green Mamba. Large and venomous, it calls southeastern Africa home. Click to see big picture (776x600 pixels; 135 KB)
The venom of the Boomslang (Dispholidus typus) is said to be potent, but slow acting.  It turns up through much of sub-saharan Africa.  Click to see big picture (627x600 pixels; 71 KB)
Boomslangs vary in color, in general the male is more green and the female comes in darker forms.  These are captive, again near Mikumi Park.
Bitis gavonica is the Gaboon Viper, found mainly in the equatorial latitudes of Africa.  Among vipers, it is the heaviest, has the longest fangs, and can produce the most venom.   This one is on display in the Serpentarium of Mendoza, Argentina.  Click to see big picture (672x600 pixels; 226 KB)
Python sebae is Africa's largest snake, a non-venomous constrictor. Known as the African Rock Python, it may be encountered through much of sub-saharan Africa, and is said to be capable of killing humans. Somehow this one made it over to the banks of the Amazon River, to the serpentarium of Leticia, Colombia. Click to see big picture (800x600 pixels; 281 KB)
The Royal Python (Python regius), on the other hand is the smallest of African pythons, and being non-venomous is popular in the pet trade. It is also known as the Ball Python, as it tends to roll up into a ball as this captive example is demonstrating. Click to see big picture (390x600 pixels; 110 KB)
A Flap-necked Chameleon poses on an aster bush near Chimwadzulu ruby mine in southwestern Malawi.  Camaeleo dilepis is found through much of sub-saharan Africa. Click to see big picture (679x600 pixels; 159 KB)
The Flap-necked Chameleon turns out to have a companion. The species is also known as Camaeleo isabellinus.  Chameleons are poorly viewed in Africa, considered to represent trickster spirits. Click to see big picture (800x558 pixels; 186 KB)
The Stargazer (or Dragon) Lizard, Cordylus (or Smaug) giganteus, is the largest member of the Cordylidae Family.  It once roamed the grasslands of eastern and southern Africa, but its numbers have been decimated by habitat loss and the pet trade.  This one is captive in Tanzania. Click to see big picture (800x418 pixels; 210 KB)
Known as the Rainbow (or Five Lined) Skink, Trachylepis (or Mabuya) margaritifera is a citizen of East Africa, but this one has immigrated to the Zoo in San Diego. Click to see big picture (800x540 pixels; 155 KB)
Cryptoblepharus boutonii is part of a species complex, found in east Africa, Australia and several islands.  They are known as Snake-eyed Skinks.  This one is at a hotel in the Tanzanian town of Morogoro. (It looks a lot like C. africanus of Kenya.)
A Nile Crocodile at Mikumi Park in Tanzania. Although named for the Nile River, Crocodylus niloticus is widespread in the rivers and lakes of Africa. Click to see big picture (800x600 pixels; 183 KB)
A closer look at the business end of Crocodylus niloticus, which is the world's largest living crocodile. Click to see big picture (800x511 pixels; 147 KB)
We turn again to the San Diego Zoo for Malacocherus tornieri, the Pancake Tortoise.  Native to Kenya and Tanzania, this species with a thin and flexible shell is endangered by the usual combination of habitat destruction and the pet trade. Click to see big picture (800x468 pixels; 185 KB)
A Giant East African Land Snail (Achatina fulica) crawls across the wall of a house in the town of Segera, Tanzania. In this case, the pet trade has spread an invasive species widely from its Eastern Africa origins. Click to see big picture (777x600 pixels; 137 KB)
Achatina fulica is not only large and invasive, it causes considerable crop damage and can act as a disease vector for both plants and animals. Click to see big picture (408x600 pixels; 69 KB)
Nephila fenestrata is one of the Golden Orb Weavers (note yellow web strands). This one is known as the Black-legged Nephila. It is reported from southern and eastern Africa, and despite the size is said to have no venom. This view shows the ventral window pattern from which it gets its species name. Click to see big picture (707x600 pixels; 76 KB)
Gasteracantha falcicornis is one of those weird horned spiders, this one near the Mozambique-Tanzania border being the Red-spiked Orb Weaver.  It hangs out in eastern and southern Africa, and unfortunately this underside is rather dull compared to the red top side. Click to see big picture (389x400 pixels; 42 KB)
We turn to a room mate of mine in a bedroom in Mbinga, Tanzania.  The three spines on its front legs indicates that this is of the Selenops genus known as the Wall-crab Spiders.  Likely S. radiatus which is native to these parts.  Click to see big picture (585x600 pixels; 78 KB)
The African Moon Moth, Argema mimosae, is encountered through much of southern and eastern Africa, here on a wall in the town of Segera. Click to see big picture (641x600 pixels; 140 KB)
A somewhat tattered example of Charaxes brutus natalensis.  A butterfly of eastern Africa, it is known as the White-barred Emperor or as simply the White-barred Charaxes. Click to see big picture (576x600 pixels; 106 KB)
We return to the town of Segera for the striking Marbled EmperorHeniocha dyops of southeastern Africa. Click to see big picture (800x446 pixels; 135 KB)
And on another wall in Segera, a classic Saturnid Moth.  Polyptychorides grayii is known as Gray's Polyptychus and is found in eastern and southern Africa. Click to see big picture (548x600 pixels; 131 KB)
A group of Sphecid Wasps south of Liparamba near the Tanzanian-Mozambique border.    The Special Family are known as Thread-waited Wasps, and some make nests of mud. Arapaho sp. likely. Click to see big picture (730x600 pixels; 125 KB)
A Dragonfly with an interesting wing pattern. Not identified. Click to see big picture (640x456 pixels; 73 KB)
Schistose greg aria, the Desert Locust can form swarms which threaten agriculture in Africa and the mid-east.   This shows the black and yellow nymph stage and an adult.  London Zoo. Click to see big picture (629x600 pixels; 144 KB)
Dinotheres sp.  A Giant Red Mite in northern Tanzania.  Also known as Velvet Mites, the genus is found mainly in sandy areas. Click to see big picture (688x600 pixels; 237 KB)
Placid pencils is one of many Cichlid species found in Lake Malawi. This one is known as the Blue Follower Cichlid, and is at the Vancouver Aquarium.  The white lips and skin splotches are typical. Click to see big picture (720x492 pixels; 86 KB)
And from the same Aquarium, this is the Peacock Cichlid (Altoona bench). It has a variable color and is generally more yellow. Click to see big picture (720x483 pixels; 103 KB)