DixPix Photographs

     

EASTERN AFRICA

 
     
  FLORA--  Asters Family  

 

The Asteraceae or Aster Family competes with the orchids for the distinction of the largest botanical family.  Eastern Africa has its fare share, and here are the examples encountered.  One photo from the closely related Campanulaceae or Bell Flower Family is appended.

 

The Mexican Sunflower (Tithonia diversifolia) did indeed start its career in Mexico, but is now pantropical and widely naturalized in Africa. It is a large, invasive plant, but cultivated as it increases soil nutrients. Photo from near Songea, Tanzania. Click to see big picture (507x600 pixels; 126 KB)
Another view of Tithonia diversifolia from near Chimwadzulu ruby mine in Malawi.  As its latin name would suggest, its leaves have diverse shapes, and its alternate name of Tree Marigold testifies to the plants size. Click to see big picture (800x542 pixels; 150 KB)
Bidens kirkii is an east african bush daisy, here in Tanzania. Click to see big picture (461x600 pixels; 85 KB)
This is likely Bidens kirkii again, in western Malawi. Click to see big picture (800x599 pixels; 154 KB)
From its origin in southeast Africa, Berkheya cirsifolia has spread to gardens in temperate climates, under names such as White Surprise. Click to see big picture (757x600 pixels; 152 KB)
Berkheya zeyheri is betimes known as the Woodland Sun Daisy. It may be found in southern and eastern Africa, here at the Chimwadzulu mine in Malawi. Click to see big picture (761x600 pixels; 234 KB)
Guizotia scabra is encountered in moist areas of sub-saharan Africa.  This one is rooted near Mbeya, Tanzania. Click to see big picture (787x600 pixels; 127 KB)
Here is Guizotia scabra again with a colorful moth, near the Kapeni River in Malawi. Click to see big picture (761x600 pixels; 153 KB)
Haplocarpha scaposa is a cheery sunflower native to southeastern parts of Africa. This one is rooted at the botanical gardens at University of B.C. Click to see big picture (626x600 pixels; 136 KB)
Osteospermum jucundum is one of the "South African Daisies".  Its natural range is small, but with many cultivars it has spread around the world. In some places such as Australia it has proved invasive. Photo from the Van Dusen Gardens, Vancouver. Click to see big picture (800x563 pixels; 126 KB)
Senecio inaequidens? is native to southeastern Africa, but it has traveled, and has become invasive in Europe, where it goes by names such as South African Ragwort. Click to see big picture (410x600 pixels; 87 KB)
As the name would suggest, Zinnia peruviana is a product of the Neotropics. It has been widely planted and naturalized, however, including here in the Katsekera region of Malawi.  Peruvian Zinnia has been tweaked into a range of colors. Click to see big picture (676x600 pixels; 135 KB)
Found mainly in east Africa, this specimen of Erythrocephalum longifolium is at home near Liparamba in southern Tanzania.  It is best known as Red Rays Click to see big picture (601x600 pixels; 126 KB)
As its latin name would suggest, Crassocephalum rubens is often of a reddish color, but it also comes in blue.  The species is found mainly in Africa, with photo from near Mblinga, Tanzania. Click to see big picture (443x600 pixels; 93 KB)
Emilia coccinea is a pantropical herb which likely had an African origin.  Its color ranges from yellow to red, and indeed it is known as the Scarlet Tassel Flower, here near Mbeya, Tanzania. Click to see big picture (800x453 pixels; 138 KB)
And from the Chimwadzulu area of Malawi, a darker version of Emilia coccinea, or something that looks a lot like it. Click to see big picture (515x600 pixels; 94 KB)
As the name would suggest, Helichrysum basalticum grows on basaltic rock, and is native to southeastern Africa.  Botanical gardens at University of B.C. Click to see big picture (525x600 pixels; 141 KB)
Helichrysum splendidum of southern and eastern Africa is appreciated for its essential oils, and other folk medicine applications. Photo from the botanical gardens at University of B.C. Click to see big picture (723x600 pixels; 211 KB)
Kleinia abyssinica is east African by origin, but has traveled in the garden circuits. Here it is blooming at KEW Gardens in London.  There is also a yellow flowered variety. Click to see big picture (769x600 pixels; 137 KB)
Cyanthillium cinereum is also known as Vernonia betonicaefolia.  It is better known as Little Ironweed with a range that includes much of Africa and Asia, and it has been naturalized more widely.  Photo from near Dodoma, Tanzania. Click to see big picture (712x600 pixels; 156 KB)
Vernonia galamensis is found through much of tropical Africa, both wild and planted. It is cultivated for the oil of its seeds. Photo from Malawi. Click to see big picture (535x600 pixels; 136 KB)
From the botanical gardens at University of B.C., this is Wahlenbergia rivularis, of the Campanulaceae or Bell Flower Family. It originates in South Africa, where it is known as Ipipiyo. Click to see big picture (676x600 pixels; 112 KB)