DixPix Photographs

     

EAST AFRICA

 
     
  FLORA-- MONOCOTYLEDONS ETC.  

 

This page includes Monocotyledons and a few other "primitive" plants from eastern and southeastern Africa.  The University of British Columbia Botanical Gardens (UBCBG) has a collection of interest from the more southerly part of this range.

Sections from East Africa include  critters    birds    flora  and  life--overview

 

Starting with the Amaryllidaceae Family. This example of Scadoxus mulitflorus at the KEW Gardens in London, is more orange and less red than usual for a species which goes by names such as Fireball and Blood Lily.  In nature it is found in sub-saharan Africa and some sites beyond. Click to see big picture (493x600 pixels; 131 KB)
Under names such as Fire Lily and Kei Lily, Cyrtanthus sanguineus has entered gardening circle from a native range in eastern and southeastern Africa.  Photo from UBCBG. Click to see big picture (594x600 pixels; 132 KB)
For some reason, Tulbaghia violacea goes my the name of Society Garlic. The species originated in South Africa, but has been naturalized in Tanzania. It is used in folk medicine and also as a garden flower. Click to see big picture (758x600 pixels; 144 KB)
Turning now to the Asparagaceae Family.  These are the flowers of the Pineapple Lily (Eucomis comosa) which is a native of southeastern Africa and a moderate player in the Garden realm.  UBCBG Click to see big picture (708x600 pixels; 142 KB)
Just why this plant is related to a pineapple is not at all clear, even in this wider view. Click to see big picture (385x600 pixels; 114 KB)
The somewhat confused fruiting structures of Lance Dracaena (Dracaena aubryana) at the KEW Gardens in London.  A species of west and central Africa. Click to see big picture (640x501 pixels; 117 KB)
Also at the KEW, this is Frosty Spears (Sansevieria suffruticosa) which hales from tropical east Africa.
Dietes iridioides is known as the Wild Iris or as the African Iris, and indeed it is native to eastern and southern Africa. It has long become a widespread garden item however, and far from wild. In fact this one is in a garden in Bogota, Colombia.  This is the start of the Iridaceae or Iris Family photos. Click to see big picture (680x600 pixels; 86 KB)
Known as the Cape Tulip, Moraea ochroleuca may indeed have started in southernmost Africa, but has spread farther north and to southern Australia. This one is in Vancouver at UBCBG. Click to see big picture (598x600 pixels; 111 KB)
Crocosmia masoniorum is known as Giant Montbretia in garden talk, and it has been planted far and wide from its home in southeastern Africa.
Dierama galpinii began it career in the mountains of Swaziland and other parts of southeastern Africa.  It has entered the garden trade as Angel's Fishing Rod, here at UBCBG. Click to see big picture (424x600 pixels; 94 KB)
Another view of the Angel's Fishing Rod, which typically leans over in bloom to look even more like a colorful fishing rod. Click to see big picture (632x600 pixels; 109 KB)
Another of the Dierama genus at UBCBG. Click to see big picture (618x600 pixels; 127 KB)
Gladiolus papilio goes by the name of Goldblotch Gladiolus in garden terms. It is native to southeast Africa, but here at UBCBG. Click to see big picture (450x600 pixels; 64 KB)
A fuller view of Gladiolus papillio. Click to see big picture (585x600 pixels; 124 KB)
The Aloe genus and kin deserve a more accessible family name than Xanthorrhoeaceae, but that is how things stand.  This one is Aloe scobinifolia, reported from Somalia and the horn of Africa, and here in residence at the botanical gardens in Denver. Click to see big picture (404x600 pixels; 100 KB)
Aloe ngongensis would call Kenya and Tanzania home, but is here rooted at the KEW. Click to see big picture (285x600 pixels; 127 KB)
Aloe speciosa is a large plant with a spectactular floral distplay.  In its native South Africa it is said to form dense thickets.  Photo from a garden in Goleta, California.
Back to Denver for Aloe wickensii, a South African species. Click to see big picture (271x600 pixels; 84 KB)
Kniphofia triangularis is one of the species from southern Africa known in garden circles as Red Hot Pokers. It is here at UBCBG. Click to see big picture (367x600 pixels; 86 KB)
A closer look the the flowers of Kniphofia triangularis. Click to see big picture (584x600 pixels; 96 KB)
Beginning the Areceae or Arum Family. The super-famous, pantropical Calla Lily.  Although it has Ethiopia in its name, Zantedeschia aethiopica is actually a child of southeastern Africa.  But it has travelled well it needs no introduction.  Photo from Malawi. Click to see big picture (800x522 pixels; 92 KB)
Zantedeschia jucunda is native to the Leolo Mountains of northeastern South Africa, and is threatened in the wild. In garden circles, however, it has been widely planted (here at UBCBG) under names such as Golden Calla and Golden Arum. Click to see big picture (727x600 pixels; 116 KB)
The African Climbing Lily (Gloriosa modesta) is indeed from southeast Africa and it belongs to the small Colchicaceae Family, many of which look like crocuses, but that genus is of the Iris family. Click to see big picture (341x600 pixels; 87 KB)
Another look at Gloriosa modesta, which has the additional name of  Butter Lily. Your guessed it, from UBCBG. Click to see big picture (558x600 pixels; 116 KB)
This yellow Dayflower from near Liparamba in southern Tanzania appears to be Commelina africana, which ranges through much of sub-saharan Africa.  Commelinaceae family. Click to see big picture (502x600 pixels; 87 KB)
A blue Commelina near Arusha, Tanzania.   Alas there are several blue Dayflowers in Africa, including some invading from the Neotropics. Click to see big picture (800x568 pixels; 121 KB)
The Giant White Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia nicolai) is found in nature on the southeast coast of Africa, but has travelled widely in suitable climates. This one graces a garden in Mexico.  Strelitziaceae family. Click to see big picture (463x600 pixels; 96 KB)
Canna indica is the flag-bearer of the Cannaceae Family, a neotropical species which has gone pantropical with a vengeance.  Here it is near Mbeya, Tanzania.  It is widely known as Indian Shot due to its hard, black seeds. Click to see big picture (392x600 pixels; 95 KB)
A handsome sedge, likely Fuirena hirsuta, in marshy ground near Korogwe in northeastern Tanzania.  Cyperaceae Click to see big picture (489x600 pixels; 130 KB)
Encephalartos hildebrandtii of the Zamiaceae is known as the Mombassa Cycad, and may be found in the lowlands of Kenya and Tanzania. It is used as emergency food, but can cause liver cancer. This one is being used as decoration at the San Diego Zoo. Click to see big picture (469x600 pixels; 164 KB)