DixPix Photographs

     

EASTERN AFRICA

 
     
  FLORA--  the ROSID CLADE  

 

The Rosids are a major subdivision within the taxonomy of flora.  It is named for the roses, but these do not appear to be a major actor in Eastern Africa.  On the other hand, the Pea Family (Fabaceae) has produced so much material that it has been given its own page.  The rest of the Rosids appear here, starting with Malvaceae, the Mallow Family.

Sectors for East Africa are     Critters        Birds        Flora       and  Life/overview

 

Hibiscus aponeurus appears to be an east african endemic, here near Liparamba in southern Tanzania. Despite its attractive flowers, it does not seem to have become a garden item. Click to see big picture (723x600 pixels; 121 KB)
A weed near the town of Dodoma, Tanzania.  This appears to be Hibiscus ludwigii, with a variable leaf shape and either white or yellow flowers.  It may be found over much of Africa, but stinging hairs on the stems prevents it from becoming a popular plant. Click to see big picture (757x600 pixels; 215 KB)
A poorly focused photo a Hibiscus trionum, a bladderweed known as the Flower of the Hour.  It is fairly widespread in subtropical zones. Click to see big picture (629x600 pixels; 99 KB)
Hibiscus schizopetalus is now a pantropical garden favorite, going by names such as Spider Hibiscus and Fringed Rosemary. Many horicultural tweeks and cultivars, but it originated in East Africa. Click to see big picture (647x600 pixels; 128 KB)
This is Abelmoschus esculentus, whose "edible" seed pods are known in English as Okra or as Ladies' Fingers.  It is widely planted in the warmer parts of earth, but likely started out in Africa.  Here, near the Tanzania- Mozambique border, it is known as Bamia. Click to see big picture (440x600 pixels; 172 KB)
Abutilon mauritianum is a species of tropical Africa that is cultivated on a small scale.  Country Mallow has varied folk medicine applications and the bark yields a dye.  The leaves are edible and also a preferred toilet paper.  Photo from near Dodoma, Tanzania, where it is known as Nwaha. Click to see big picture (669x600 pixels; 97 KB)
Also near Dodoma, this is Malvastrum coromandelianum, known as         Prickly Malvastrum.  It is a pantropical invasive weed from the Americas. Click to see big picture (425x600 pixels; 92 KB)
It is known as the Stinging Pavonia, but the fine hairs of Pavonia urens are said to cause more of an itch than a sting. Native to the central latitudes of Africa, with photo from near Songea, Tanzania. Click to see big picture (800x516 pixels; 121 KB)
Unidentified.  Likely the fruit of Momordica sp. Click to see big picture (576x600 pixels; 94 KB)
Ricinis communis originated in Africa, India and Mediterranean region, but is now a weed throughout the warmer parts of the earth.  Its spread is partly because of an invasive nature, and partly due to planting as the source of Castor Oil.  Most parts are poisonous.  Euphorbiaceae Family. Click to see big picture (800x491 pixels; 140 KB)
Euphorbia sp.  Although distinctive and a bit bizarre, this weed from near Dodoma, Tanzania eludes my ability to classify it beyond genus. Click to see big picture (800x517 pixels; 199 KB)
There are a lot of strange Euphorbia in southern and southeastern Africa.  This one is known as the Baseball Plant (Euphorbia obesa).  It is widely cultivated but rare in its native Cape Province due to collecting.  Lotusland, Montecito, California.
From the same garden, this is the Medusa's HeadEuphorbia caput-medusae is found around Capetown, but now mainly in gardens.
Euphorbia barnardii is a cactus-like creation, native to the Limpopo Province of South Africa and now threatened in the wild.
Euphorbia mauritanica is widespread in southern Africa, and in gardens under names such as the Golden Spurge.  Once again, Lotusland, Montecito, California.
It is this fruit that gives Ochna thomasiana of the Ochnaceae Family, the name of Bird's Eye Bush. A citizen of East Africa. Click to see big picture (638x600 pixels; 152 KB)
From the Kapani River area of Malawi, this is Tricliceras longipedunculatum which is from the Passion Flower Family, Passifloraceae despite the simplicity of its flowers.  Locally called the Roadside Pimpernel, it is endemic to East Africa. Click to see big picture (800x541 pixels; 180 KB)
Turning now to the Cleomaceae or Caper Family, this is Cleome hirta, growing as a weed near Dodoma, Tanzania.  It is known as Purple Mouse-whiskers. Click to see big picture (742x600 pixels; 162 KB)
And from farther south near the town of Songea, here is another take on Cleome hirta.  The species is native to the central latitudes of Africa. Click to see big picture (365x600 pixels; 79 KB)
Cleome gynandra has edible leaves, and hence is esteemed and traveled.  It goes by names such as Spiderwisp and Shona Cabbage in English and as Kisii here in its native East Africa. Click to see big picture (449x600 pixels; 112 KB)
This is the fruit of Coccinia adoensis, a vine of East Africa.  Most of the plant may be eaten if cooked.  It also has a place in traditional medicine, and is known as Mikumi. This one is a weed near Arusha, Tanzania.  It hales from the Squash or Cucumber family, Cucurbitaceae. Click to see big picture (454x600 pixels; 69 KB)
Here is the flower of Momordica foetida near the town of Liparamba in southern Tanzania. It is a species with some applications in traditional medicine and is found through much of sub-saharan Africa.  Its spiny fruit goes by several names, generally translating as "snake food". Click to see big picture (558x600 pixels; 96 KB)
From the Geraniaceae or Geranium Family we have Pelargonium laevigatum, which carries a South African passport, but here resides at the KEW gardens in London. Click to see big picture (683x600 pixels; 125 KB)
Callistemon citrinus is an Australian member of the Myrtaceae or Myrtle Family.  The Crimson Bottle-brush is now a widespread and widely naturalized shrub, including here in Malawi. Click to see big picture (425x600 pixels; 100 KB)
The Melastomataceae Family is not as important in Africa as in other parts of the tropics.  Here, however, are the flowers of Dissotis princeps, known as the Royal Dissotis and found mainly in eastern sub-saharan Africa.  Photo from south of Liparamba, Tanzania. Click to see big picture (662x600 pixels; 137 KB)
And from the same general area, this a more blue-colored specimen. Click to see big picture (693x600 pixels; 161 KB)
Also from near Liparamba, this is from the Greyia genus of the Melianthaceae Family.  It is one of the species known as South African Bottlebrushes. Click to see big picture (609x600 pixels; 118 KB)
Turning to the Oxalidaceae, which is the Oxalis or Woodsorrel Family, this is Oxalis depressa, the South African Oxalis. It is indeed native to southern Africa, but is here rooted at the botanical gardens at the University of B.C. Click to see big picture (643x600 pixels; 142 KB)
This photo, on the other hand, is of the Broadleaf Woodsorrel (Oxalis latifolia) near Arusha, Tanzania.  It is not native, but naturalized from the Neotropics. Click to see big picture (784x600 pixels; 210 KB)
The Polygalaceae Family, goes by names such as Milkworts and Snakeroots.  This is the Myrtle-leaved Milkwort (Polygala myrtifolia) which is native to southern Africa, but widely planted of obvious reasons.  Here at the San Diego Botanical Gardens. Click to see big picture (771x600 pixels; 146 KB)
And here is a more chewed-upon example of the Myrtle-leaved Milkwort fighting nature in Malawi. Click to see big picture (623x600 pixels; 95 KB)
Polygala virgata goes by names such as September Bush and Purple Broom.  It is native to southern and eastern Africa, and is here in southernmost Tanzania.  As a garden item it has become naturalized in Australia and elsewhere. Click to see big picture (542x600 pixels; 109 KB)