DixPix Photographs

     

WESTERN AMAZON

 
     
  AMAZON AMPHIBIANS  

 

The Amazon rainforest comes alive at night with the sound of frogs.  It is more a cacophony than a symphony, but where the forest has been preserved it is always amazing a the variety of voices.  Perhaps this is not so surprising, as there is thought to be over a thousand species in the Amazon region.  Some are brightly colored and poisonous, or hoping predators will think they are.  Others are dull green or brown and difficult to classify.

Due to the requirements of a moist skin, most frogs in drier or temperate climates stay close to water, but in a rainforest they are free to live anywhere, and many are tree frogs, adapted to climbing and life in the canopy.  Some of them use the water held in tank bromeliads to lay their eggs.  Not all is well with frogs in the modern world, however.  To the usual problem of habitat destruction, most species are being devastated by a fatal fungus infection.

 

Lets start with a true weirdo.  Meet Ceratophyrs ornata, the Ornate Horned Frog.  It is native from Brazil south into Argentina, and in Spanish is known as Esceurzo Argentino.  This one is at the Vancouver Aquarium, however. Click to see big picture (720x572 pixels; 144 KB)
Hypsiboas lanciformis is sometimes known as the Rocket Tree Frog.  It is native to northwestern South America, and this one is perched in the Sacha Lodge Reserve of the Napo Valley in eastern Ecuador. Click to see big picture (574x600 pixels; 73 KB)
Hypsiboas punctatus in a night photo.  It is called the Polkadot Tree Frog, but this is an unusually red specimen so the red polka dots on its back are less apparent.  Despite is delicate appearance, it is found though much of tropical South America. Click to see big picture (551x600 pixels; 91 KB)
An Amazon Milk Frog (Trachycephalus resinifictrix), which should be in the canopy of rainforests of the western and northern Amazon basin, but is here at the zoo in Santa Barbara, Calif.  It is called a milk frog because it exudes a poisonous white secretion when disturbed. Click to see big picture (640x427 pixels; 99 KB)
And here is that Amazon Milk Frog again, demonstrating that it has a blue belly, and that it can actually climb up a glass wall. Click to see big picture (519x600 pixels; 87 KB)
Osteocephalus buckleyi, known as Buckley's slender-legged Tree Frog, is mainly encountered in the western Amazon basin.  This one is on a screen at the Sacha Lodge in eastern Ecuador. Click to see big picture (553x600 pixels; 158 KB)
Another Osteocephalus buckleyi tries to find a place to hide as a room becomes occupied in the same lodge.  Here it is called the Bromeliad Tree Frog, and in Spanish it is known as Rana de Casco Buckley. Click to see big picture (626x600 pixels; 134 KB)
A White-lipped Rain Frog (Leptodactylus bolivianus).  Under names such as Rana-sapo Boliviano, this species ranges from Costa Rica to Bolivia.  That includes part of the Amazon basin, but this one had its portrait taken in the mountains of eastern Panama. Click to see big picture (800x533 pixels; 143 KB)
Leptodactylus pentadactylus is native from Nicaragua to Paraguay.  It likes wet areas, and goes by names such as Smokey Jungle Frog and in Spanish as the Rana-toro Comun (common bull frog).  Large, as South American frogs go. Click to see big picture (724x600 pixels; 183 KB)
A warty green frog on the roof of a tent, consuming the bugs which are trying to get at the inhabitants.  This is likely something from the Scinax fuscivarius complex, known as the Snouted Tree Frogs.  Calanoa Reserve, amazonian Colombia. Click to see big picture (800x575 pixels; 133 KB)
A view of the same frog from inside the tent.  Scinax fuscivarius is a highly variable species or species complex. Click to see big picture (611x600 pixels; 146 KB)
A Two-stripe (or Grasshopper) Tree FrogScinax ruber is another of these variable cases which may be a species complex.  In one form or another it is found through much in tropical South America.  This one is in eastern Ecuador. Click to see big picture (516x600 pixels; 88 KB)
Ameerega bilinguis is a colorful little creature known as the Ecuador Poison Frog.  They do not seem worried about handling it here a the Sacha Lodge Reserve, however. Click to see big picture (679x600 pixels; 84 KB)
A view of the blue, spotted undersides of Ameerega bilinguis.  The species is found mainly in eastern Ecuador. Click to see big picture (720x551 pixels; 83 KB)
An unidentified yellow-legged frog from the Wildsumaco Reserve, Ecuador. Click to see big picture (720x600 pixels; 115 KB)
Large and warty, the Big-headed Rain Frog (Oreobates quixensis) is large for its genus.  It is native to the upper (western) Amazon basin, and is a terrestrial species, adapting to open areas and agriculture.  There is some confusion as to which family this genus graces. Click to see big picture (656x600 pixels; 135 KB)
Rhinella margaritifera of northern South America is a variable species which goes by names such as Crested Forest Toad, Sapo Crestado and South American Toad. Click to see big picture (431x500 pixels; 87 KB)
Rhinella schneideri is known as the  Rococo or Cururu Toad, or in its range from eastern Bolivia to Argentina as Sapo Rococo
A Nauta Salamander (Bolitoglossa altamazonica) is a climbing salamander, found mainly in the western Amazon basin.  Photo again from Sacha Lodge Reserve, eastern Ecuador. Click to see big picture (720x566 pixels; 77 KB)
One of the South American Caecilians (Oscaecilia sp.) from the Wildsumaco Reserve on the western rim of the Amazon basin.  They look like snakes, but are earthworm-eating amphibians than hide in leaf litter.