DixPix Photographs

     

WESTERN AMAZON

 
     
  PRIMATES  

 

It should be of no surprise that the Amazon rain-forests host the majority of 'New World' monkeys and related primates.  The generic word for monkey here tends to be Mico, the Brazilian term, but the Spanish Mono is also common.

 

Alouatta caraya is known as the Black Howler, but only the males are black, so this is clearly a female.  Their native range is from eastern Bolivia to northern Argentina, and this one is relaxing at the Mendoza Zoo in the latter.  In Argentina at least, it is known as Mono Caraya. Click to see big picture (800x512 pixels; 130 KB)
A closer view of a young female, thanks to the Guira Oga animal rescue center in Iguazu, Argentina.
A Brown Woolly Monkey (Lagothrix lagotricha) hangs above the Matamata River in Colombia's Amacayacu Park.  Here it would be known as a Churuco, or as a  Mono Lanudo.  It is the most common species of woolly monkey, and native to southeastern Colombia and adjacent parts of Brazil, Peru and Ecuador. Click to see big picture (584x600 pixels; 200 KB)
The woolly monkey can become a little over-friendly when habituated to humans.  Here one near the Amacayacu Primate Rescue Center (Miakuchiga) gives Diego Samper, (founder of the Calanoa Reserve), a very warm welcome. Click to see big picture (631x600 pixels; 135 KB)
A White-fronted Capuchin (Cebus albifrons cuscinus) bares its teeth as we approach over Lago Pilchicocha in the Sacha Reserve, Ecuador.  This is the Shock Headed subspecies and fairly wide-ranging in the western Amazon basin. Click to see big picture (728x600 pixels; 181 KB)
A calmer view of the Shock Headed Capuchin, with an unfortunate branch in the way. Click to see big picture (624x600 pixels; 132 KB)
A Cebus apella, the Brown Capuchin peers at us through foliage of Amacayacu Park  near the Amazon River in Colombia.  This is a common and widespread species , and goes by names such as Mono Maicero Click to see big picture (489x600 pixels; 110 KB)
A chance encounter with a troop of Black Capuchin on a trail in Iguazu Park gives a better look at this species.  Here they are known as Mono Cai, andt his is near the southern limit of their range.  They were once considered the same species as the brown capuchin, but are now separated as Sapajus nigritus.
This full length view of a Black Capuchin shows the luxurious, prehensile tail, and also the black fur that has come to distinguish this group from the brown capuchin.
And this is the Common Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) encountered through much of northern South America.  This is one of a group habituated, in the town of Coca, Ecuador. Click to see big picture (685x600 pixels; 169 KB)
Saimiri sciureus is known simply as Mono Ardilla in Latin America.  Here is another photo from Coca. Click to see big picture (362x600 pixels; 82 KB)
It is known as the White-eared Titi Monkey in English.   Callicebus donocophilus is native to Eastern Bolivia and Paraguay, but is here at the zoo in Santa Barbara, California.  That fur looks like it is designed for a cooler climate. Click to see big picture (743x600 pixels; 185 KB)
In its native range, Callicebus donocophilus is known as the Huicoco de Bolivia. Click to see big picture (622x600 pixels; 134 KB)
Leontopithecus chrysomeles, the Golden-headed Lion Tamarin is native to far eastern Brazil, but loss of habitat has left few in the wild.  On the other hand they are colorful and popular in zoos, in this case the London Zoo.  (Yes, its range is outside of the Western Amazon, but with such a cute pose---). Click to see big picture (543x600 pixels; 115 KB)
Saguinus nigricollis graellis climbs a tree in the Sacha Lodge Reserve in the Napo Valley of Ecuador.  In English it would be termed Graell's (Black Mantled) Tamarin. Click to see big picture (376x600 pixels; 91 KB)
Graell's Tamarin is found mainly here in eastern Ecuador, but also in adjacent parts of Brazil, Peru and Colombia.  The local names for the species include Titi Cuello-negro and the more colorful Diablito. Click to see big picture (720x560 pixels; 155 KB)
A side view of Graell's Tamarin at Sacha Lodge Reserve, Ecuador. Click to see big picture (778x600 pixels; 177 KB)
A Saddle-back or Brown-mantled Tamarin, Saguinus fuscicolis, checks us out at the Jatun Sacha Reserve in the upper Napo Valley.  It is a species of the western Amazon basin.  One of the local names is Mico Bebeleche, perhaps the white mouth looks like it has been drinking milk. Click to see big picture (622x600 pixels; 120 KB)
Peering from their home, a family of nocturnal Night Monkeys, also known as Owl Monkeys.  This is Aotus trivirgatus, or Humboldt's Night Monkey found in much of the western Amazon basin.  Photo from the Sacha Lodge Reserve in the lower Napo Valley of Ecuador. Click to see big picture (611x600 pixels; 179 KB)
The striking Silvery Marmoset or Mico Argenteus.  Callithrix argetentata is found in Brazil and eastern Bolivia, but this one is posing at the London Zoo. Click to see big picture (288x600 pixels; 64 KB)
The Pygmy Marmoset is considered the world's smallest monkey (there is a smaller lemur). Callithrix pygmaea is diurnal and arboreal, native mainly to eastern Ecuador and Peru, where it goes by Titi Pigmea.  This one is captive in Victoria on the west coast of Canada. Click to see big picture (640x579 pixels; 103 KB)