DixPix Photographs

     

CUBA

 
     
  FAUNA  

 

The eastern mountains have more or less wild sectors that let some fauna survive, but anything big enough to be worth eating is at risk.  It is mainly the creepy-crawly things that one gets to meet.

 

This magnificent Cuban Boa was a rare find, but alas killed by the campesinos as soon as they saw it. Epicrates angulifer
Click to see big picture (377x480 pixels; 89 KB)
I was told that this snake is poisonous, but that its mouth is too small to be dangerous. Click to see big picture (640x457 pixels; 147 KB)
And this rather long snake I was told bites, but is not venomous. Click to see big picture (640x417 pixels; 111 KB)
Anoles, with their painted and inflatable throats are common in Cuba, and there are many species.  Anolis sp. Click to see big picture (640x376 pixels; 97 KB)
This is a special species, the Oriente Knight Anole, Anolis smallwoodi. Captive. Click to see big picture (640x457 pixels; 125 KB)
And what would a tropical hotel room be without a gecko or two? Click to see big picture (640x474 pixels; 108 KB)
Less welcome is Blaberus giganteus, the Giant or Cave Cockroach, native to the Caribbean, Central America and discerning pet shops. cockroach
Yellow frogs, making more frogs. Click to see big picture (608x370 pixels; 140 KB)
The very loud Greenhouse Frog, Eleutherodactylus panirostris, is usually blamed on Cuba, although also to be heard elsewhere in the Caribbean.  Here it is in Hawaii, where it has proved very invasive and unpopular due to its loud voice. Click to see big picture (587x395 pixels; 143 KB)
One of the Julia butterflies, likely Drias iulia. Click to see big picture (640x270 pixels; 58 KB)
A thoroughly ugly, wounded bat. Click to see big picture (609x480 pixels; 117 KB)
A wounded Brown Pelican (Pelicanus occidentalis), a breeding adult of the Atlantic race, on the shore of Cuba. pelican
Presumably the Cuban Crocodile, Crocodylus rhombiferCaptive, happily. Click to see big picture (640x407 pixels; 118 KB)
And if you are feeling vulnerable you will be glad to know that the Cuban vultures are very polite, they form lines and wait. Click to see big picture (640x345 pixels; 107 KB)
For part of Cuba's geological history, drifting eastward on a tectonic plate, it was mainly or totally submerged.  Fossil coral still forms cliffs, now uplifted to various elevations.  The stalactites show that this is a lime-rich cliff. Click to see big picture (640x431 pixels; 146 KB)
Two of the many interesting patterns in the fossil corals. Click to see big picture (640x377 pixels; 149 KB)
Another view of the creatures in the fossil reefs. Click to see big picture (640x415 pixels; 182 KB)
And corals are still alive and well in some coasts, here the intricate patterns of a fan coral. Click to see big picture (608x480 pixels; 172 KB)