DixPix Photographs

     
INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO  
     
  WATER BIRDS AND BIRDS OF PREY  

 

The very fact that we are dealing with an archipelago of islands, coupled with the many rivers of the tropical rain forest, gives rise to a great number and variety of water-oriented birds, most of which eat fish.  Also included are a few of the raptors with a more varied diet.

 

The Brahminy KIte (Haliastur indus) soars above coastlines and rivers from India to Australia. Click to see big picture (520x480 pixels; 35 KB)
Known also as the Red-backed Sea Eagle, the kite is here content to watch rivers in northern Borneo. Click to see big picture (640x385 pixels; 43 KB)
A close-up view of a captive kite. Click to see big picture (335x480 pixels; 60 KB)
The Indian Black Eagle (Ictinaetus malayensis malayensis) has most of its range farther northeast, but it extends into Indonesia as far as Suluwesi and the Moluccas island.  Here, however, it is found in the Jurong Bird Park in Singapore. Click to see big picture (380x480 pixels; 59 KB)
Also captive is this White-belly Sea (or Fish) Eagle, Haliaeetus leucogaster.  When in nature, it may be found from India to Australia. Click to see big picture (424x480 pixels; 79 KB)
Another shot of the sea eagle, showing its remarkable ability to turn its head 180 degrees. Click to see big picture (376x480 pixels; 74 KB)
A Malay (or Barred) Eagle Owl, Bubo sumatranus, looking rather grumpy; but who wouldn't when tethered to a perch at the Jurong Bird Park.  Normally it hunts the lowlands of Thailand, Malaya and Indonesia. Click to see big picture (426x480 pixels; 79 KB)
Back to Sabah, a Buffy Fishowl (Ketupa ketupu) monitors the Menanggul River.  Its range is from India to Indonesia. Click to see big picture (503x480 pixels; 95 KB)
is this an owl or a frogmouth?  Caught napping by an abandoned house in central Sumatra. Click to see big picture (354x480 pixels; 75 KB)
The Oriental Darter, also known as Snakebird (Anhinga melanogaster) in a classic pose above a river in northeastern Sabah. Click to see big picture (549x480 pixels; 35 KB)
The darter can be found over much of southeast asia, looking and acting almost exactly like the anhinga of the neotropics of the western hemisphere. Click to see big picture (640x421 pixels; 49 KB)
A very telephoto shot of the rare Storm Stork, Ciconia stormi, near the northeast coast of Sabah.  Note the huge orange bill. Click to see big picture (482x480 pixels; 82 KB)
The more common Milky Stork, Mycteria cinerea.  Here captive, but otherwise ranging from Cambodia to Indonesia. Click to see big picture (547x480 pixels; 75 KB)
Looking sleek and alert, this Eastern Great Egret (Ardea modesta) is patiently watching the Kinabatangan River.  Click to see big picture (462x480 pixels; 116 KB)
The egret is more commonly found in rice paddies, and has flourished with this style of agriculture across Asia. Click to see big picture (463x480 pixels; 110 KB)
The Nankeen or Rufous Night Heron , Nycticorax caledonicus, is another river watcher found throughout Indonesia, not to mention Australia and the Philippines.  It looks a lot like its American cousin, but lacks the red eye. Click to see big picture (324x480 pixels; 47 KB)
Such a big bill! A Blue-eared Kingfisher, Alcedo meninting, at the Kelandaun Oxbow Lake, Sabah. Click to see big picture (640x453 pixels; 68 KB)
Another view of the Blue-eared Kingfisher, showing off its colorful plumage.  The local name of Burung Pekaka Bintik is larger than the bird itself. Click to see big picture (502x480 pixels; 57 KB)
Another kingfisher in the same area.  I have not been able to put a name to this one. Click to see big picture (612x480 pixels; 106 KB)