DixPix Photographs

     

INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO

 
     
  Flora: UNPLACED AND UNKNOWNS  

 

This page presents flora from a few botanical families which did not fit into other pages, and several species which the author was not able to identify, but which are sufficiently distinct that they are likely to be recognized by those more familiar with Indonesian flora.

Water Lilies are collected into the Nymphaeaceae family, which include many species which have been spread around the world to adorn garden ponds and have been tweaked and cross-bred into many cultivars.  The number of species likely to be found on natural ponds in Sumatra, however, is more limited. The Indonesian term for water lilies is Teratai.

 

This appears likely to be Nymphaea nouchali, which originated in India and Africa but has been naturalized in Indonesia since antiquity. Click to see big picture (640x459 pixels; 62 KB)
And this appears to to be the pink form of Nymphaea pubescens, a southeast Asian species, complete with a small frog.  In some areas water lilies are referred to as 'frog pulpits'. Click to see big picture (640x456 pixels; 98 KB)
And this may well be the white phase of Nymphaea pubescens.  One would have to check for hairs on the undersides of the leaves to be sure. Click to see big picture (605x480 pixels; 99 KB)
The Piperaceae Family is huge, but its minute flowers are less than photogenic.  It does, however, have two important species in southeast Asia.  
Piper betle is a vine whose leaves are widely chewed with the nut of the areca palm (and some alkaline agent).  Chewing this 'betel nut' provides a mild stimulant, which is extremely popular and likely addictive.  The leaves may also be chewed as cough medicine or for arthritis.  Indonesians call the plant Sirih. Click to see big picture (266x480 pixels; 74 KB)
On the other hand, the seeds of Piper nigrum is the source of both black and white pepper.  It is a native of India, but now pan-tropical.  Merica Giling is one of the Indonesian translations. Click to see big picture (618x480 pixels; 119 KB)
And while on spices, cinnamon is made from the inner bark of trees from the Cinnamomum genus of the Laurel Family.  This is native to southeast Asia, and referred to as Kulit Manis in bahasa.  In addition to cuisine, it is used for toothaches and for diabetes.  Click to see big picture (640x447 pixels; 117 KB)
UNKNOWNS-- The following are plants of distinctive character that the writer (who is not a botanist) was not able to identify from photographs, even to a family level.  
There are many strange fruits met in the Sumatran forests.  The locals tend to just call them all "buah hutan" -- forest fruit. Click to see big picture (426x480 pixels; 67 KB)
Some look like they should be edible, but its likely not a good idea to experiment. Click to see big picture (557x480 pixels; 92 KB)
This jungle melon was called Kondor, but I have no way of tracing  it. Click to see big picture (628x480 pixels; 88 KB)
A spectacular vine from central Sumatra, that can climb up and over even high trees. Click to see big picture (352x480 pixels; 99 KB)
Here are the flowers of that vine, locally called the Merah-Kuning vine, which simply translates as 'red-yellow'. Click to see big picture (608x480 pixels; 84 KB)
There are an amazing variety of creepers in these jungles, which have the ability to ascend tree trunks. Click to see big picture (640x456 pixels; 156 KB)
Pink blossoms turn to blue berries in this species from northern Suluwesi. Click to see big picture (640x455 pixels; 80 KB)
A round-leaved herb huddles in the timberline forest of Mt. Kinabalu, Sabah. Click to see big picture (458x480 pixels; 98 KB)
In the same area, this delicate lace plant looks like a frost. Click to see big picture (299x480 pixels; 85 KB)
A white flower looking a bit like a Gesneriad in the lower forest of Kinabalu. Click to see big picture (474x480 pixels; 87 KB)
In the lower reaches of Kinabalu Park,  this delicate, eight petal flower. Click to see big picture (425x480 pixels; 57 KB)
Elsewhere in Sabah, flowers with unusual wrinkles. Click to see big picture (640x480 pixels; 65 KB)
And a white flower vine, perhaps some sort of morning glory. Click to see big picture (640x473 pixels; 71 KB)
And from Sumatra, yellow flowers with a similar habit.
Finally this odd ball-flower from Batang Ai in Sarawak. Click to see big picture (602x480 pixels; 105 KB)