DixPix Photographs

     

INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO

 
     
  OTHER FOODS  

 

The food photos from this area have been divided into three pages, namely Fruits and Vegetables, items which would seem Weird Foods to the eyes of Westerners, and finally this page which discusses what is left.

 

The primary staple through most of the Indonesian region is, of course, rice.  Wherever land is flat and wet enough, it has been turned to this form of agriculture. Click to see big picture (640x346 pixels; 93 KB)
It can actually be quite frustrating trying to pick ones way through a maze such as this.  In addition to paddies style of farming, there are also dry land forms of rice. Click to see big picture (640x418 pixels; 136 KB)
Drying rice in the traditional way at an Ian long house in Sarawak. Click to see big picture (640x428 pixels; 126 KB)
Being a tropical archipelago, fish are an important food group.  These minute minnows are presented in piles at markets, sold for soups or crumbled as a condiment. Click to see big picture (575x480 pixels; 156 KB)
At the other end of the scale, a tuna lies in its blood on a coastal boat off Suluwesi. Click to see big picture (640x418 pixels; 134 KB)
Some fish on display are obviously carnivores with impressive teeth.  Others were likely the prey.  All end up at the market. Click to see big picture (640x420 pixels; 138 KB)
Catfish-like, with feelers which probably were use to feel their way along the bottom of muddy rivers. Click to see big picture (610x480 pixels; 106 KB)
Eels, drying in a Sumatran market. Click to see big picture (640x441 pixels; 163 KB)
Tilapia is a general name for several members of the Cichlidae family.  They originated in Africa, but some species have spread around the tropics. Click to see big picture (640x383 pixels; 105 KB)
The attraction of Tilapia is that they are easy to farm in fresh water and good eating.  Here stopping by a fish farm on Batang Ai reservoir in Sarawak to pick up makings for lunch. Click to see big picture (640x467 pixels; 103 KB)
An interesting way of presenting smoked fish at a market in Minahasan Suluwesi. Click to see big picture (583x480 pixels; 129 KB)
The fish on the left is a Sultan Fish, known as Jelawat (Leptobarbus hoeveni) of fresh waters. The others appear to be patterned eels of some sort. Click to see big picture (458x480 pixels; 104 KB)
Different types of fish-bits neatly piled and waiting buyers in a Sumatran market. Click to see big picture (640x427 pixels; 127 KB)
Chicken, or parts thereof, are tastefully presented with a smile. Click to see big picture (640x444 pixels; 117 KB)
But if you look around the back of the market stalls, they look a bit different. Click to see big picture (640x473 pixels; 142 KB)
Most of Indonesia is a good place to be a pig, as they are forbidden to Muslims.  Packs of wild pigs can actually be dangerous in the forests.  This is the Bearded Pig, Sus barbatus, which is Sumatran by birthright, but here captive. Click to see big picture (405x480 pixels; 87 KB)
Iban cooking, vegetables boiled in green bamboo and skewered fish over a campfire. Click to see big picture (517x480 pixels; 111 KB)
For the tourists, an instant feast from the forest and rivers. Click to see big picture (592x480 pixels; 128 KB)
The Common Fig, Ficus carica is pan-tropical, and locally known as Buah Ara. Click to see big picture (615x480 pixels; 100 KB)
But the forest presents a great many other species of Ficus, most of which have fruit which grows directly from trunks or main branches.  On the left is the Cluster (or Gular) Fig, Ficus racemosus, which is edible but usually infested with fig flies. Click to see big picture (640x455 pixels; 111 KB)
Coconut and Cacao (think chocolate) are so common around the tropics of the world that they hardly need any introduction. Click to see big picture (640x445 pixels; 112 KB)
Cassava root was originally from South America, but is now an important food source in many parts of the tropics.  In fact it is the third largest carbohydrate source worldwide.  Indonesians call it Singkong, otherwise Manihot esculenta of the Euphorbia family. Click to see big picture (628x480 pixels; 135 KB)
Yams (on left) and Taros a both cultivated and collected wild.  Some species of yam (Discorea sp.) are well known in the west.  The taro shown is a giant form, Alocasia Macrorrhizos, which is considered emergency food only. Click to see big picture (609x480 pixels; 129 KB)
And then there are spices-- after all, the fabled Spice Islands are part of the Indonesian Chain.  Cinnamon, however, originated in Sri Lanka, but has been introduced to Java and Sumatra, where it is known as Kayu Manis (Cinnamomum sp.). Click to see big picture (568x480 pixels; 110 KB)
Black Pepper originated in India, but spread early through southeast Asia.  It is derived from the seeds of the Piper negrum vine, of the same family (Piperaceae) as betel leaf. In bahasa the usual term is Merica. Click to see big picture (565x480 pixels; 109 KB)
Turmeric is derived from the root of Cucuma longa.  It is again of Indian origin, but spread widely and early.  It belongs to the ginger family. Click to see big picture (388x480 pixels; 80 KB)
In the markets of the Indonesian region, there are a great number of spices, condiments and other colorful offerings. Click to see big picture (617x480 pixels; 126 KB)
Alas, few are as popular as the hot chili's, which is unfortunate for those of us who have tried to preserve our taste buds. Click to see big picture (640x435 pixels; 172 KB)
And there are many items on sale that simply draw a question mark. Click to see big picture (314x480 pixels; 76 KB)
Water Spinach is a pan-tropical morning glory which is locally called Kangkung (Ipomoea aquatica).  The shoots are edible and it is used against both headaches and insomnia. Click to see big picture (576x480 pixels; 61 KB)
A few fairly familiar fruits beckon in the forest, such as this raspberry from high on Kinabalu Mountain in Borneo. Click to see big picture (640x460 pixels; 114 KB)
This is likely Physalis minima (maybe angulata), a ground cherry or tomatillo from tropical America, but now pan-tropical and in the wild.  Known in Sumatra as cipluan or ciplukan.  (This may be written Chipluan as 'c' is pronounce 'ch' in bahasa.)  Edible and medicinal fruit lies within the husk. chipluan
There are, however, many strange fruits that one encounteres in the jungles.  The local people tend to pass them off as Buah Hutan (forest fruit), of unknown edibility. Click to see big picture (640x324 pixels; 74 KB)
On a larger scale , there are also melons of various types to tempt the curious. Click to see big picture (640x387 pixels; 92 KB)
Some of these look even more intriguing on the inside.  Are you tempted? jungle fruit