DixPix Photographs

     

TROPICAL MESOAMERICA

 
     
  UNIDENTIFIED FLORA  


Collected here are a few of the unidentified floral photos taken in Mesoamerica, which the writer has not been able to identify to a family level, but which are sufficiently distinctive that those more expert in neotropical botany will likely recognize.  Starting in Mexico and moving south.

 

I was informed that this fruit in Oaxaca State, Mexico, was called 'Rejargar ' (approx.) and that it was used to poison dogs.  The leaves are unusual. Click to see big picture (501x480 pixels; 85 KB)
In the same region of southern Mexico, a fruit known as Manzanita Loca, which is reported to be sweet of taste, but causes dizziness. Click to see big picture (511x480 pixels; 82 KB)
At the Wildsumaco Reserve in Ecuador, this large, red, oval fruit easily catches the attention. This turns out to be Wild Tamarillo, Solanum betaceum. Click to see big picture (286x480 pixels; 61 KB)
From near Xochicalco, minimalist flowers and ear-shaped leaves whose rim sprouts threads that end in a round bead. Click to see big picture (519x480 pixels; 91 KB)
From a cloud forest in northern Nicaragua, another shrub with similar flowers, cauliflorus to partly flattened stems.  This turns out to be Penax rugosus of the Urticaceae.  It ranges from southern Mexico to southeastern Brazil. Click to see big picture (387x480 pixels; 76 KB)
From the same region, a hairy calyx and twisted anthers mark this rather attractive shrub, perhaps from the Actinidiaceae. Click to see big picture (470x480 pixels; 67 KB)
This plant's structure, but not the flowers, are similar to the Ephedras.  From the dry forests of coastal southwest Nicaragua. Click to see big picture (373x480 pixels; 52 KB)
From high on Cerro de la Muerte, Costa Rica.  This has a heath-like habit, but only four petals. This turns out to be Chaetolepis cufodontisii, a melastoma despite leaves. Click to see big picture (589x480 pixels; 129 KB)
From the same area, a pink flowered herb nestles among volcanic rocks. Click to see big picture (516x480 pixels; 138 KB)
Leaves, stems and flowers are all unusual in this plant from Juan Blanco Castro Park in Costa Rica. Click to see big picture (591x480 pixels; 129 KB)
From a road side south of San Jose, yellow and white trumpets with double green stigma tips.  This flower has been filed on the web under Macrocarpea, of the Gentians, but with a question mark.  Likely M. auriculata. Click to see big picture (560x480 pixels; 88 KB)
I was told that this is the Kerosine Fruit', and that it will actually burn on its own-- it certainly smelled that way.  Haven't found a fit.  From the Sarapaqui Reserve. Click to see big picture (325x480 pixels; 96 KB)
A rather unusual seed pod from near Bosque de Paz in central Costa Rica.  Perhaps from one the the Jacaranda species. Click to see big picture (640x460 pixels; 67 KB)
A thick-leaved vine with alternate arrow-shaped leaves, and both the pods and flowers showing.  From the Dota area in the mountains of southern Costa Rica. Click to see big picture (360x480 pixels; 62 KB)
Four sided sucker flowers on long tendrils, and a rough leaf texture mark this unknown. Click to see big picture (328x480 pixels; 89 KB)
A shrub with purple-calyx, tube flowers and spotted leaves. Click to see big picture (594x480 pixels; 110 KB)
A closer look at the cauliflorous tube flowers with their purple calyx.  Perhaps some form of Cestrum. Click to see big picture (596x480 pixels; 93 KB)
A weed from the Boquete area of Western Panama.  This vine or scrambler has bright red flowers and burr-like seeds.  This turns out to be Tourretia lappaceae of the Bignonia Family. Click to see big picture (640x440 pixels; 137 KB)
From Bajo Mono area, a tall, almost orchid-like, weed with armed leaf edges. Click to see big picture (424x480 pixels; 88 KB)
An alpine cluster-herb.  Close observations shows yellow micro-flowers from red bracts.  This may be an aster, but a mighty strange one. Click to see big picture (507x480 pixels; 132 KB)
A mangrove zone tree from Panama's Isla de Zapatilla. Click to see big picture (640x465 pixels; 96 KB)
And here is the fruit of the above mangrove zone tree. Click to see big picture (631x480 pixels; 107 KB)
The aliens have arrived.  From a field in western Panama.  Note the curved claws. Click to see big picture (640x469 pixels; 106 KB)
Four petal liana flowers, northeastern Panama, Click to see big picture (349x480 pixels; 86 KB)
From Isla Colon, northwest Panama.  Disc flowers with trigonal symmetry hide beneath a square-stem vine. Click to see big picture (640x467 pixels; 92 KB)
Another vine with orange, four-petal flowers and paired, frilled, felt-like leaves.  A weed near Bogota. Click to see big picture (497x480 pixels; 87 KB)
White trumpet herb, Peiera area of the Colombian highlands. Click to see big picture (413x480 pixels; 49 KB)
A bush in upland Colombia, with both 4 and 5 petal flowers. Click to see big picture (640x458 pixels; 86 KB)
A shrub with five, impressed veins in a large leaf.  Veins radiate from a common, basal origin. Click to see big picture (640x398 pixels; 94 KB)
From the Condor Range, a five vein shrub with bronzed underleaf. Click to see big picture (484x480 pixels; 136 KB)
P Palmate, white leaf tree-tops viewed from a helicopter.  These turn out to be Cecropia telenivea, the Yarumo blanco (or plateado). Click to see big picture (616x480 pixels; 130 KB)
  An orange flower with a rose-like shape springs from a branch at the Wildsumaco Reserve in central Ecuador.  This multi-petal arrangement is rare in wild flowers.
  Unidentified at the Jatun Sacha Gardens of Ecuador, a pink-tuft flower and red fruit.
  Oval leaves and a cluster of twisted white tubes define this plant at the Wildsumaco Reserve.  This is likely from the Neea genus of the Nyctaginaceae family.