DixPix Photographs

     

SOUTH CORDILLERA

 
     
  FAUNA:  MORE BIRDS OF WATER AND SHORELINE  

 

From alpine marshes to the open ocean, a major percentage of birds living in or around the Southern Cordillera are associated with water.  In fact there are so many that the group is split into two pages, with Swans, Ducks, Geese and Gulls treated separately.  Here are the others.

 

A Great Egret is poised to strike.  Known here as the Garza Grande (Ardea alba), it has been able to establish itself in warm or temperate climates around the world. Click to see big picture (640x421 pixels; 146 KB)
The smaller Snowy Egret or Garza Chica (Egretta thula) ranges from the U.S. to most of the way south in Chile and Argentina.  Click to see big picture (480x480 pixels; 46 KB)
The snowy egret is at home in both fresh and salt water habitats.  Here in southern Chile it ranges well up into the mountains in summer. Click to see big picture (640x457 pixels; 66 KB)
The prolific Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis) started out in Afro-asia, but has exploded into most parts of Latin America.  It is more closely related to the herons than to the other egrets. cattle egret
The White-necked Heron (Ardea cocoi) is the largest of the herons in Chile, where it is known as Garza cocoi.  It is widespread in South America, with many names, Garza Morena being one of the more widespead.
A lighter version of Garza cocoi perched above an irrigation canal in the central valley of Chile.
The South American Flamingos seem most at home in the saline lakes of the Altiplano, where Chile, Peru, Bolivia and Argentina come together.  These are the Chilean Flamingos. Click to see big picture (640x373 pixels; 78 KB)
A close-up of a Chilean Flamingo or Parina Grande in captivity.  Also known as Flamenco Chileno (Phoenicopterus chilensis). Click to see big picture (640x437 pixels; 84 KB)
The Chilean Flamingo is wide-ranging.  From a river in southern Peru (above) to the marshes of Patagonian Argentina (below). flamingos
Another citizen of the alitplano lakes is the Giant Coot (Fulica gigantea), locally called the Tagua Gigante.  All coots are a bit strange, these just take it to a new level. There are also two other species of coot in the Altiplano for confusion. Click to see big picture (640x232 pixels; 60 KB)
Fulica armillata is known is English as the Red-gartered Coot.  Here in Chile it tends to be called Tagua Comun, but the species is widespread in South America, where various forms of Gallareta are more common.
The Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) is indeed common, having adapted to temperate zones around the world.  In South America its range extends south into northern Chile and Argentina. Click to see big picture (592x480 pixels; 139 KB)
The Purple Gallinule (Porphyrio martinica) is a rail, at home from the southern U.S.  to central Argentina.  In the south Cordillera it is found in northern Peru and then southward to east of the Andes. Click to see big picture (531x480 pixels; 155 KB)
Another bird found in many places world-wide is known as the Huairavo in Latin America and the Black-crowned Night-heron elsewhere (Nycticorax nycticorax). Click to see big picture (640x417 pixels; 66 KB)
On the left is the lighter 'hoactii' subspecies of Huairavo found in the Altiplano, in this case in northern Chile.  While near the adjacent coast, a juvenile bird finds shelter.  It looks very different from the adult, but has the red eyes. Click to see big picture (640x362 pixels; 105 KB)
The Green Heron (Butorides virescens) ranges from Canada south to Bolivia and perhaps northern Argentina.  The South American form is considered to be Butorides striatus by some authorities. Click to see big picture (472x480 pixels; 92 KB)
The Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea) seems to be classified as an egret, and in Spanish is referred to as the Garza Azul.  Its range extends from the north down to coastal Peru and northernmost Chile. Click to see big picture (623x480 pixels; 118 KB)
The Fasciated Tiger-Heron (Tigrisoma fasciatum) monitors the creeks along the eastern skirts of the Cordillera as far south as northwestern Argentina. tigerheron
Podiceps major is the largest of the grebes, and often called the Great Grebe.  It is largely confined to southern South America, and here in Chile is known as Huala. great grebe
The ever watchful Patagonian Ringed Kingfisher or Martin Pescador (Megaceryle torquata stellata) hangs out in southernmost Chile. Click to see big picture (450x480 pixels; 68 KB)
Pardirallus sanguinolentus landbecki is the subspecies of Plumbeous Rail found in central Chile and adjacent Argentina, where it is known as Piden.  This one has characteristics of both juvnile and adult forms.  It is a marsh species, but here caught on a farm road in Chile.
Pelicans are likely the most distinctive and obvious bird of the Pacific Coast, partly because they have adapted to towns and fishing fleets.  The red bill marks a breeding adult. Click to see big picture (328x480 pixels; 48 KB)
Although called the Peruvian Pelican  (Pelecanus thagus), their range extends southward through all but the southernmost part of the Chilean coast.  The local name is simply 'Pelicano'. Click to see big picture (624x480 pixels; 116 KB)
Pelicans are great flyers, often high in flocks and at other times in lines skimming over the waves. Click to see big picture (640x479 pixels; 84 KB)
And then there is their distinctive Kamikaze dive for fish. Click to see big picture (394x480 pixels; 109 KB)
The other large and common bird which has adapted to the Pacific coast is the Cormorant,  which is Cormoran in Spanish, although most species have particular names. Click to see big picture (337x480 pixels; 62 KB)
The Imperial Cormorant is also known as Imperial Shag or Cormoran Imperial (Phalacrocorax atriceps).  It is largely a creature of the Patagonian coasts, both in Chile and Argentina. Click to see big picture (500x480 pixels; 118 KB)
The Neotropical Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus) on the other hand ranges from Mexico to the southern tip of South America.  Its local name is 'Yeco'. Click to see big picture (498x480 pixels; 80 KB)
The classic Cormorant pose, drying its wings. Click to see big picture (549x480 pixels; 88 KB)
With its red bill, the Oystercatchers are hard to miss.  This is the American Oystercatcher or Pilpilen (Haematopus palliatus), which graces coastlines from Canada south to Peru, Chile and Argentina. Click to see big picture (640x367 pixels; 78 KB)
In Patagonia, however, it is replaced by the Magellanic Oystercatcher or Pilpilen Austral (Haematopus leucopodus). Click to see big picture (606x480 pixels; 97 KB)
Inca Terns (Larosterna inca) are colorful citizens of the Pacific Coast of South America.  Santa Barbara Zoo.
A trio of Whimbrel checks out the surf near Arica, Chile, hoping for a chance to feed probing the shoreline.  This species breeds in North America, in fact it is often called the Hudsonian Whimbrel, but takes its winter vacations in South America. Click to see big picture (640x445 pixels; 82 KB)
In Latin America the Whimbrel is known as a Zarapito or Perdiz de Mar.  Its scientific handle is Numenius phaeopus hudsonicus. Click to see big picture (640x446 pixels; 75 KB)
A grey bird, the Willet is known as the Playero Grande.  Its latin name is Tringa semipalmata, although some authorities use Catoptrophorus as the genus name.  It breeds in marshlands of North America, but winters on the coasts of Peru and northern Chile. Click to see big picture (551x480 pixels; 119 KB)
The Marbled Godwit or Zapitero Moteado (Limosa fedoa)  breeds in northern North America, but travels at least as far south as the coast of Peru. Click to see big picture (444x480 pixels; 116 KB)
The Black-necked Stilt (Himantopis mexicanus) ranges from the United States into southwest Peru and northern Argentina. Click to see big picture (594x480 pixels; 172 KB)
The Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melonleuca) actually breeds in northern North America, but can migrate as far south as Patagonia.  In Chile it is known as Pitotoy. yellowlegs
A Wandering Tattler on the move.  This species (Heteroscelus incanus) has a range as far south as coastal Peru, where it is known as the Playero Gris. Click to see big picture (456x480 pixels; 67 KB)
The Snowy Plover (Charadrius nivosus) is considered endangered in coastal California, but its South American form is known as Chorlo Nevado, and is doing well on the coasts of Peru, Chile and Argentina. Click to see big picture (511x480 pixels; 104 KB)
A flock of Snowy Plovers feeds in the wave zone. 
Killdeers are at home in farms or coasts.  They are mainly North American, but also work the coasts of Peru (Charadrius vociferus). Click to see big picture (402x480 pixels; 82 KB)
And finally, the peep that has gained the name of 'Least Sandpiper', or in Spanish Playero Enano (Calidris minutilla).  All three names relate to their small size, but this does not reflect their range, from Alaska to coastal Peru. Click to see big picture (635x480 pixels; 81 KB)
Humboldt's Penguin (Spheniscus humboldti) may be found along the coasts from southern Peru to Southern Chile.  These, however, are on the California coast at the Santa Barbara Zoo.