DixPix Photographs

     

SOUTH CORDILLERA

 
     
  Flora: ASTERACEAE, Sunflower-like  

 

The ASTER or SUNFLOWER FAMILY is known either as ASTERACEAE, or by the older and more descriptive name COMPOSITAE.  It is a huge family, something like 23,000 species globally.  Although the orchid family has more species, the asters are more prominent, especially in temperate climates.  The family is renown both for its variety of garden flowers and for its variety of widespread weeds.

There have been a very great number of Asteraceae species described in the Southern Cordillera, and much confusion.  For purposes of this web site, the family has been rather roughly divided into six pages, namely Cluster Flowers, Daisy Like, Dandelion Like, Senecios and Kin. Sunflower Like, and finally Thistles and Vines.  This does not follow more formal and complex methods of dividing the family.

 

Sunflowers are a common crop through much of the Southern Cordillera, and indeed in sunnier parts of the world.  They are varieties of Helianthus annuus, and in Spanish are called Girasol, referring to the way they turn their heads to follow the sun. They are also called Maravillas. Click to see big picture (640x429 pixels; 174 KB)
Verbesina encelioides is known as Golden Crownbeard in North America, but is reported to be widespread and native in Argentina where it is known as Girasolito, and suspected of being a toxic weed. Click to see big picture (640x449 pixels; 117 KB)
A similar species, or perhaps the same one, is a common weed through much of northwestern Argentina.
Known as Coronilla de Fraile or as Incienso, the three varieties of Encelia canescens may be found from Peru down into central Chile.  In Peru, the native name is Mancapaqui. Click to see big picture (640x422 pixels; 84 KB)
And while in Peru, this is a similar species from the Cordillera Negra. Click to see big picture (556x480 pixels; 110 KB)
And while in the Cordillera Negra, here are a couple of unidentified species from near the town of Aija, Ancash Department.
Flourensia thurifera is endemic to central Chile, where it is known as the Maravilla del Campo. Click to see big picture (524x480 pixels; 102 KB)
Madia chilensis is found through most of Chile south of the Atacama.  Its local name is Melosa, meaning tarweed. Click to see big picture (605x480 pixels; 102 KB)
Leptocarpha rivularis is an aster bush from southern Chile, although in this case residing at the Botanical Gardens at Univ. of Berkeley.  It is known as Palo Negro, but several plants seem to be saddled with this term. Click to see big picture (485x480 pixels; 90 KB)
Another bush flower of central and southern Chile is Mitique, Podanthus ovatifolius approx. Click to see big picture (640x434 pixels; 111 KB)
From the central Andes of Chile and Argentina, a sunflower referred to as Maravilla del Cerro, Viguiera revoluta. Click to see big picture (640x366 pixels; 80 KB)
Here's an oddity, a 'sunflower' that grows in water.  From the Talca region of south-central Chile.  Click to see big picture (640x381 pixels; 102 KB)
The same or a similar species from an irrigation ditch near Parral in southern Chile.
And from the same region, a red-stemmed species. Click to see big picture (430x480 pixels; 75 KB)
Jumping to the Famatima Range of La Rioja Province, Argentina, an unidentified eight-petal flower. Click to see big picture (510x480 pixels; 81 KB)
From over 4000 meters in the mountains southeast of Lima, another alpine species. alpine daisy
From about the same altitude in Peru's Cordillera Negra, an unusual aster bush with very small, trident-shaped leaves, suggesting Coreopsis senaria.
From the rocky slopes of the dry Andes in Salta Province, a 'sunflower' with innumerable petals, likely from the genus Hysteronica. Click to see big picture (508x480 pixels; 119 KB)
Also from Salta Province, this fuzz-head is Dinoseris salicifolia caught in the process of going to seed. Click to see big picture (440x480 pixels; 85 KB)
From high in the ranges of Western Peru. Click to see big picture (640x383 pixels; 122 KB)
Also from 3500 meters up in Peru's Yauyos Range, a species with lyrate leaves. lyrate leaves
And from the altiplano of Bolivia. Sunflower-like plants abound, but identification is not easy. Click to see big picture (450x480 pixels; 110 KB)
Dendroseris litoralis is known as the Cabbage Tree.  It is native to the Juan Fernandez Islands, but has here been planted on the adjacent coast of Chile.  Click to see big picture (640x440 pixels; 110 KB)
Turning from yellow flowers to ones less 'sunflower' in appearance, this is Proustia pyrifolia, known as Tola Blanca in central and southern Chile. Click to see big picture (640x458 pixels; 103 KB)
A holly-leaved Leucheria? from La Rioja Province of Argentina.  Species of the genus Perezia can look a lot like Leucheria in photographs. Click to see big picture (541x480 pixels; 81 KB)
This unidentified species is unusual in having leaves that wrap almost entirely around the stems. Click to see big picture (640x467 pixels; 131 KB)
A lovely pink example of Leucheria from the Curico area, but alas there are several species of this sort.
This blue specimen is likely Leucheria coerulescens, of southern Chile and Argentina. Click to see big picture (388x480 pixels; 58 KB)
A similar species from the Maule watershed.  This style of plant is known as Leuceria.   Possibly Leucheria runcinata. Click to see big picture (640x476 pixels; 70 KB)
It looks a bit like a Leucheria, but this is Almizcle, Moscharia pinnatifida, a scrambling plant from the hills above Santiago. lucheria
From just north of central Chile, a Blanquillo, likely Leucheria cerberoana. Click to see big picture (553x480 pixels; 80 KB)
And unidentified pink Leucheria, from the Socos area in Chile's Norte Chico. Click to see big picture (441x480 pixels; 102 KB)
Another pink Leucheria from altitude in the Central Andes.  Click to see big picture (614x480 pixels; 101 KB)
And yet another pink species (Leucheria?), this time from coastal Peru. Click to see big picture (640x379 pixels; 94 KB)
This appears to be one of the varieties of Proustia cuneifolia, which are found over much of Chile, in northwestern Argentina and likely northward.  The local name is Huañil. Click to see big picture (640x463 pixels; 130 KB)
A holly-leaved from of Proustia cuneifolia from La Rioja Province of Argentina. Click to see big picture (462x480 pixels; 89 KB)
The seeds of Proustia pyrifolia put on a serious summer display in central and Southern Chile.  Despite this color, its local name is Tola Blanca. Click to see big picture (380x480 pixels; 76 KB)
Perezia atacamensis seems now to be renamed P. purpurata.  It does grace the Atacama of Chile and Peru and apparently into Argentina, and is known as Marancel. Click to see big picture (339x480 pixels; 43 KB)
This flower looks like some multi-petal cultivar, and indeed has been pressed into the floral trade.  It is native, however, here in northwestern Argentina and northward into Peru and Bolivia, meet Zinnia peruviana.