DixPix Photographs

     

SOUTH CORDILLERA

 
     
  Flora:  EVENING PRIMROSE FAMILY  

 

ONAGRACEAE, the Evening Primrose family is comprised of roughly 640 species, widely distributed around the world.  Many thrive in temperate climates such as the Southern Cordillera.  Some genera, such as the Fuchsias are important garden flowers, while others, such as the Willowherbs, are invasive weeds. Those which tend to bloom at night are often called Don Diego de la Noche.  The family is part of the Myrtales Order, named for the myrtles.

 

Few flowers are more attractive than the Magellanic Fuchsia (Fuchsia magellanica), which is common in the south and central parts of Chile and in adjacent Argentina. Click to see big picture (325x480 pixels; 75 KB)
A closer view of the flowers of Fuchsia magellanica.  In Chile, the species goes by the name of Chilco or Chilca. Click to see big picture (640x333 pixels; 65 KB)
Although rare, there are also white of pink versions of Fuchsia magellanica, in this case in the UBC Bot. Gardens. Click to see big picture (458x480 pixels; 89 KB)
Fuchsia boliviana grows to 3000 meters in the mountains of Bolivia, Peru and northwestern Argentina.  Here are two color variations. Click to see big picture (636x480 pixels; 102 KB)
Commonly known as Huasita, Clarkia tenella is an extremely variable species, common in the central and southern parts of Chile. Click to see big picture (640x479 pixels; 164 KB)
A bluish form of Clarkia tenella with blue anthers, on a beach in Chile. A more indigenous-sounding name for this plant is Inuil. Click to see big picture (310x480 pixels; 41 KB)
And an alpine version of the same plant at altitude in the central Andes. Click to see big picture (538x480 pixels; 53 KB)
This is presented as an unidentified Clarkia from southern Chile at the Univ. Berkeley Bot. Gardens. Click to see big picture (434x480 pixels; 71 KB)
Oenothera acaulis is the classic Don Diego de la Noche.  It is a low herb with large flowers, common in south and central Chile. Click to see big picture (640x480 pixels; 72 KB)
A side view of Oenothera acaulis, which is also known as Rodalan. Click to see big picture (499x480 pixels; 83 KB)
The large, yellow-flowered Oenothera are of several species, often similar.   This one has the appearance of O. affinis, but there are many contenders in the genus. Click to see big picture (640x307 pixels; 83 KB)
A somewhat similar plant encountered at altitude In the Andes of Salta Province, Argentina.  This is of the right appearance and place to be Oenothera affinis. Click to see big picture (640x474 pixels; 196 KB)
Another species from altitude, prostrate but classic.  From 3000 m in the Yauyos Range, Peru. primrose
From Patagonian Argentina, likely Oenothera magellanica. Click to see big picture (640x410 pixels; 113 KB)
And this has been identified as Oenothera odorata at the UBC Bot. Gardens.  Home base would be southern Argentina and Chile. Click to see big picture (640x455 pixels; 82 KB)
The tall Oenothera glazioviana is a North American immigrant, which has taken root at scattered locations in the Southern Cordillera. Click to see big picture (377x480 pixels; 71 KB)
On certain species of Oenothera, yellow flowers turn red as they age.  This is such a case from Peru. Click to see big picture (552x480 pixels; 115 KB)
The Willowherbs, Epilobium sp., form numerous largely forgettable species of weeds.  They are so difficult to tell apart that even Chileflora (see flora overview) have not tried (at time of writing) to give species names to any of the eight examples on file.  I suspect this wiry case is E. brachycarpum, the Panicle Willowherb, a gringo established in Patagonia. Click to see big picture (640x385 pixels; 75 KB)
And this one from high at the head of the Maule River in Chile, appears to be Epilobium barbeyanum, although there are other contenders. 
This herbaceous example from south-central Chile shows the pink-veined petals typical of several species of Epilobium Click to see big picture (583x480 pixels; 131 KB)
And from the mountains of La Rioja, a very tall, lovely example which I have not been able to name. rioja
And then there is the swamp-bound Daraznillo de Agua (Ludwigia peploides).  This shows the wet habitat typical of Ludwigia species.  It may be found from the USA to Chile and Argentina. Click to see big picture (640x432 pixels; 129 KB)
A closer look at the flower of Ludwigia peploides.  Five-petals, unusual for an evening primrose. Click to see big picture (624x480 pixels; 84 KB)
The leaves of this plant look more like Ludwigia grandiflora, but that species is not supposed to be in the region of Lago Vichuquen, Chile. Click to see big picture (530x480 pixels; 85 KB)