DixPix Photographs

     

SOUTH CORDILLERA

 
     
  Terrain - THE DESERT RANGES  
 

 The Andes from 30 degrees of South Latitude up to the Chile-Peru frontier at about 18 degrees, borders the Atacama Desert.  The mountains tend to be dry and often volcanic, typically separated by salt lakes or salt pans known as salars.  To some extent this overlaps the treatment of the Altiplano.

 

Typical of the desert ranges, this aerial view is of an area along the Chilean border with northernmost Argentina. Click to see big picture (596x445 pixels; 63 KB)
Another aerial photo emphasizing the volcanic nature of the terrain and the salars.  This is from SW Bolivia, adjacent to Chile. Click to see big picture (608x399 pixels; 83 KB)
Farther south, the ranges of San Juan Province, Argentina, the bright colors are the result of volcanic ash being stained by various oxides of iron. Click to see big picture (640x396 pixels; 105 KB)
The dominant mountain in the region is Volcan Llullaillaco on the Chile-Argentine border.  At 6739 meters it is the fifth highest volcano in the world.  It holds the world record as the highest archeological site, with structures and three child sacrificial mummies found.  This is from the south. Click to see big picture (640x415 pixels; 60 KB)
And this is Volcan Llullaillaco from the east. Click to see big picture (586x447 pixels; 84 KB)
Volcan Socompa (6051 m.) lies to the northeast of Llullaillaco, across a pass that sports a rough road and a little-used railway. Click to see big picture (640x418 pixels; 55 KB)
Volcan Azufre (5692 m.), also known as Volcan Lastarria, is located on the Chile-Argentine border at the latitude of Taltal. Click to see big picture (587x371 pixels; 93 KB)
The author pauses at a sulfur fumerole area during ascent of Volcan Azufre.  This is not recommended, when the wind changes it is hard to hold your breath at altitude, and the fumes are searing. Click to see big picture (571x378 pixels; 82 KB)
Volcan Ollague (5870 m.) above a town with the same name.  More smoke plumes, the whole region is like a pressure cooker. Click to see big picture (629x391 pixels; 93 KB)
Nevados de Famatima, also known as Cerro Belgrano (6250 m.) in La Rioja Province, Argentina. Click to see big picture (565x403 pixels; 74 KB)
This isn't really the Andes, but there are some strange hoodoos in Ischigualasto Park in a sector known as Valle de la Luna, San Juan Province of Argentina.   Click to see big picture (319x480 pixels; 81 KB)
Volcan Parinacota (6330 m.) above Lago Chungara on the Chile-Bolivia border marks the north end of this sector. Click to see big picture (610x397 pixels; 86 KB)