DixPix Photographs

     

SOUTH CORDILLERA

 
     
  Terrain - LAKES OF THE SOUTHERN CONE  

 

Between the tip of South America and about 39 degrees south latitude, lakes are large and abundant on both sides of the Andes. These fill basins gouged out by glaciers descending from the mountains during the ice ages.  To the north, most lakes are artificial, until reaching the saline ponds of the Altiplano, which are typically in closed basins.

 

Starting in the south, with the Cuernos de Paine above Lago Pehoe. Click to see big picture (640x431 pixels; 118 KB)
Looking across Lago Viedma at the south side of the Fitzroy and Cerro Torre Massif, Patagonian Argentina.
Click to see big picture (640x339 pixels; 57 KB)
Lago San Martin of southern Argentina, its extension into Chile is called Lago O'Higgins.  These are the names of the two principal liberators of the respective nations.
Click to see big picture (640x414 pixels; 78 KB)
Cochrane Lake behind the town of Cochrane in Patagonian Chile. Click to see big picture (640x458 pixels; 122 KB)
Lago General Carrera is Chile's largest lake, and feeds the Rio Baker, which is its largest river.  Set in the mountains, it is nothing short of splendid. It extends eastward into Argentina, where it is called Lago Buenos Aires. Click to see big picture (640x426 pixels; 80 KB)
This is a typical glacial fed lake in southern Chile, with water milky with glacial silt. Click to see big picture (317x480 pixels; 57 KB)
Lago Verde in Chile lies near the Argentine border just south of the 44th Latitude. Click to see big picture (352x480 pixels; 62 KB)
Farther north, there is also a Lago Verde in Argentina. Click to see big picture (640x446 pixels; 128 KB)
On the Chilean side again, Lago Yelcho lies south of the town of Chaiten, which has recently been destroyed by a volcano. Click to see big picture (634x400 pixels; 93 KB)
Lago Epuyen near the Argentine town of El Bolson is known mainly for tourists and boating, but this is a photo looking across at part of the Cordon del Derrumbe. Click to see big picture (640x418 pixels; 104 KB)
Lago Puelo, south of Bariloche in Argentina. Click to see big picture (619x415 pixels; 73 KB)
Same scene with some black necked swans in the foreground. Click to see big picture (640x450 pixels; 129 KB)
Lago Nahuelhuapi, the east end of a large lake, looking across at the tourist town of Bariloche, Argentina. Click to see big picture (640x406 pixels; 77 KB)
On another trend, this is an aerial photo of the San Maximo Salinas, saline ponds on the Argentine pampas which have turned purple, presumably by an algal bloom due to fertilizers from the surrounding farms.  Laguna La Amarga in the background. Click to see big picture (640x361 pixels; 87 KB)
Back to Chile, looking at Volcan Osorno over the beautiful Lago Llanquihue (pronounced "yankeeway", approximately) Click to see big picture (640x380 pixels; 70 KB)
That's worth a second view.   Click to see big picture (305x454 pixels; 47 KB)
A view of Lago Ranco, of the Chilean Lake district. Click to see big picture (640x406 pixels; 86 KB)
Lago Villarrica, taken near the town of that name, and looking at the sometimes active Villarrica Volcano, Click to see big picture (618x411 pixels; 75 KB)
At the east end of Lago Villarica, La Peninsula juts out from the tourist town of Pucon.
Lago Budi is a coastal lake west of Temuco in Chile. Lacking mountains, it needs some foreground to make a photo. Click to see big picture (621x400 pixels; 96 KB)
Embalse Colbun is a major reservoir on the Maule River to west of the city of Talca in Chile.  At this latitude, most lakes are either artificial or alpine. Click to see big picture (640x439 pixels; 48 KB)
Laguna del Maule, at the head of the Maule River, is a natural lake at 3092 meters altitude, whose level has been raised by the addition of a dam. Laguna del Maule
Another example of the alpine lakes is Lago Teno, also known as Lago Planchon, at the head of the Teno River, to east of the Chilean city of Curico. Click to see big picture (640x480 pixels; 92 KB)
And on the Argentine side, there is Lago Diamante, looking at Volcan Maipo on the Chilean border. Click to see big picture (640x443 pixels; 96 KB)
Here is something different, a giant sinkhole or glacial kettle left by an ice age glacier near the Argentine ski development of Las Leñas.  It likely formed when a huge section of ice left by a retreating glacier was surrounded by outwash gravels, then melted.   Click to see big picture (322x480 pixels; 48 KB)
Something else different, evening light reveals Lago Vichuquen, near the coast west of the city of Curico. Click to see big picture (596x417 pixels; 58 KB)
The many saline lakes of the altiplano attract wildlife such as vicuñas and flamingos. saline lake
Lago Chungara in Chile on the Bolivian border is high enough to avoid much salinity, and home to the giant coot as well as cameloids. Chungara
Lago Conococho stands at the entrance to the Rio Santa Valley and the famous Cordillera Blanca of Peru. Conococho Lk.
A big jump northward to the very large, and very high, Lago Titicaca which is held by Bolivia and Peru.  I won't make any jokes about the Bolivian navy.  These are some of the islands in the lake. Click to see big picture (640x347 pixels; 72 KB)
This shows a spit forming on the northwest shore of Lago Titicaca, formed from sediments from the obvious drainage. Click to see big picture (640x270 pixels; 49 KB)
Part of Lago Titicaca is chocked with weeds, as shown here.  Rushes are actually used on the lake to make boats and floating platforms. Click to see big picture (640x425 pixels; 125 KB)
At ground level, the border between Peru and Bolivia on the shores of Lake Titicaca, or at least how it looked in 1966. Click to see big picture (640x383 pixels; 56 KB)