DixPix Photographs

     

SOUTH CORDILLERA

 
     
  Terrain - WATERFALLS  

 

Given the extreme rainfall of southern Chile, and given the short distance between the high Andes and the adjacent Pacific Ocean, it should be no surprise that waterfalls abound.  Many are nameless, being simply too common a feature.  Here is a small sampling.  Waterfalls are called either "cascadas" or "saltos"

 

With terrain so recently exposed after glaciation, many of the falls in southern Chile have not had time to erode a valley, and just spill over the raw topography.
Click to see big picture (315x480 pixels; 79 KB)
The power of the larger waterfalls is felt as much as it is seen. Click to see big picture (617x405 pixels; 60 KB)
Another photo, from the Lake District of Chile, that gives the feeling of power. Click to see big picture (613x416 pixels; 68 KB)
Some falls are notable for their simplicity   Click to see big picture (298x480 pixels; 28 KB)
And others for complexity, the popular Ojos de Caburgua is near the town of Pucon, Chile.    Click to see big picture (307x480 pixels; 90 KB)
Nearby there are the twin falls of Salto Bellavista.
The Salto Llifen, near Lago Ranco of the Chilean Lake District. Click to see big picture (528x480 pixels; 79 KB)
Two views of the powerful Salto del Indio in the Lonquimay area.
And in the same area, the more delicate Salto Princesa, which one may walk behind.
Salto del Laja is well known, occurring near the Pan-American Highway north of the town of Los Angeles, Chile.  This is a view in the dry season. Click to see big picture (640x430 pixels; 129 KB)
And here is a more typical scene from the Spring. Click to see big picture (602x480 pixels; 109 KB)
Laja is actually a collection of several falls. Click to see big picture (640x434 pixels; 88 KB)
Another popular area centered on waterfalls is a park to the east of the town of Talca, known as Reserva National Radal Siete Tazas.  This is the Boda de Novia falls.   Click to see big picture (360x480 pixels; 82 KB)
Siete Tazas, also written 7 Tazas, means seven cups or basins.  The name comes from a series of falls and plunge pools, two of which are shown here.   Click to see big picture (320x480 pixels; 75 KB)
Some of the pools at 7 Tazas are used for swimming, but it is damn cold. Click to see big picture (603x480 pixels; 144 KB)
A twin falls descending into the Melado Valley Click to see big picture (412x480 pixels; 112 KB)
Although most waterfalls are on the Chilean side of the Andes due to a higher rainfall, there are many cascades descending into Argentina as well.  This is from south of Mendoza.   Click to see big picture (324x480 pixels; 95 KB)
This falls into the Paradones Valley east of Rancagua is locally known as the
Chorro de la Vieja  As the climate becomes drier north of Santiago, waterfalls become rarer.
  Click to see big picture (313x480 pixels; 83 KB)